Tuesday, November 21, 2017

The end of the Sky Condo

As I climbed into the Sky Condo to start the 2017 hunting season, the top step broke off from the tree sending a chuck of wood to the ground and leaving the bulk of the rung hanging down to the next step. I lifted my gun off my shoulder and slid it onto the floor of the Sky Condo and them threw my backpack up.  I got myself into the stand and looked down at the damage.  We were going to have to replace a few rungs before the following week.  And my silent entry into the woods was anything but.


I sat there for a couple of hours and then headed for my stand in the woods to see if anything was walking through. 


I was cautious walking in and looked for any sign of brown.  I made it around the corner when I heard that tell-tale sound of a deer blowing.  I watched as two flags ran from under my stand, away from me and into the ticker woods.  My cover was blown but I had hoped that the deer would head towards the stand that Hubs was in since he had a doe permit.  No such luck.

I sat in my stand for a few hours and then Hubs and Dad showed up to get me and head out of the woods for lunch (this was two days before this happened)  We didn't stay out long and made a plan for the rest of the night.  I was heading back to the Sky Condo to sit and asked Hubs to walk me back in to make sure that  I was all set getting back up, given the broken rung. 

I made it three or four rungs up when another one broke beneath me.  I lowered myself back to the ground and headed over to Hub's ground blind to wait out the rest of the night.  Nothing was moving and I was out of my comfort zone being on the ground.

I walked out at the end of legal hours and closed out the first day of the rifle season with seeing two deer butts running away from me...but at least I saw deer!


We decided that night that this is the last season of the Sky Condo as we know it.  There will be a bigger and better Sky Condo for the 2018 season. Stay tuned for that!

Monday, November 6, 2017

The competition is on!

If you do not follow me on Facebook, then you don't know that Dad totally schooled us in how to shoot a big buck.  Did some scouting, brought his gun, right place, right time, incredible buck! (Mom's flip phone doesn't take great pictures)


So, that leaves Hubs (who has a doe permit) and I (who does not) to attempt to get a shot at one of these big bucks!  The competition is on!










Wednesday, October 18, 2017

Maine's youngest fisherwoman

How do you create outdoor kids?  You have them grow up experiencing outdoor adventures like it is a normal part of life.

Over the summer, as I was on maternity leave, I was determined not to let the nice weather slip away without getting some fun, outdoor adventures in.  Staci from MyMainelyGirlAdventures took me to one of her favorite fishing spots.  I loaded up the baby, my waders (which I fit back into!) and into the water we went.



We didn't catch any fish, but we did have a few bites.  I had the most action on my fly line that I have ever had!  Could have been the flies we put on or, maybe, this baby will be my good luck charm!

The weather was perfect and we got to enjoy a few hours in the water wetting our lines and catching up.  What better way to enjoy my maternity leave?

Friday, September 1, 2017

An increase in trespassing


Trail cameras are addicting. You buy one, get some pictures then decide that you should have another one at a certain intersection and the next thing you know, you are like us and have almost 10 out in the woods, trying to pattern your deer.  That excitement of pulling those memory cards quickly vanishes when you see things that don’t belong on your property. 


In the past couple of months, we have had lots of activity on the trail cameras; a car driving around in the newly planted clover and a man walking through a highly traveled deer intersection.  Both men had to make an effort to get where they were; this was not just an 'oops, I took a wrong turn.'  We had posted signs up already and clearly that was not enough of a deterrent to keep them away. This is when it pays to be friends with police officers.  I sent pictures of the car to a friend, who came back within minutes with the name of the car's owner.  I did the same thing with the pictures of the blonde man, baseball hat on backwards and watch on his left wrist.  Thanks to trail cameras, there are eyes in the woods even when you are not there.  As a result in this increase, we have started putting cameras out for our cameras just in case someone tries to steal the camera (or the memory card) that has their picture on it.  It is easy to hide a camera when its sole purpose is to keep another camera safe.

It is also disappointing.  It used to be that you could trust people to respect your land and their lack of access to it.  People would communicate with the landowner if they wanted to be on the land to hunt, fish, trap and/or forage.  There was a mutual understand and respect for the owner, user and land itself.  I remember hunters coming to the door and talking to Dad about hunting on our property a month before the deer season was scheduled to start.  Dad would sign their landowner permission slip and ask them to hunt in a certain region of the land and not to use four wheelers.  Everyone was happy and followed the agreed upon rules.  That is clearly not the case anymore.  I understand why more land is being posted.  Within hours of seeing the car on our trail cam photos, I added more posted signs to our property

So what happened? Why the lack of respect for landowners? and when did trespassing become a new norm?  Across the country, there is discussion around protecting public land for hunters to use.  Here in Maine, more than 95% of our land is privately owned (Maine.gov.) That is a lot of land to lose access to if trespassing continues to increase and landowners begin or continue to post their land.  A few bad apples could ruin it for everyone, so it is up to us to discourage it, report it and work to keep hunting lands available.