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What to buy the hunter on your Christmas list

Apparently, I am hard to buy for. I don't think I am but I have been told that I am by multiple people. So, here is my helpful personal list of what to buy a hunter for Christmas or Hanukkah or Festivis.

1. Books. My suggestions this year are:
Meat Eater by Steven Rinella. I asked Santa for it and I am pretty sure its wrapped and waiting under my tree. I have not read it, but I did read American Buffalo and it was fantastic!

Suddenly the Cider Didn't Taste so Good
by John Ford. John is a former Game Warden who tells wonderful Maine stories of the adventures, animals and people he encounters. Light hearted and a quick read.

Tales from Misery Ridge by Paul Fornier. Paul was a Maine Guide and worked for Inland Fisheries before he retired. He tells great stories of the people and places he traveled to around Maine.

2. Clothes.
Anything but cotton. If you can find women's wool pants, without the weird stitching around the knees that will make me scratch when I sit down, then let me know! I have tried on many pants and they either don't fit right or they have the weird knee stitching that rubs just above my knee. And since I sit for hours on end, I look more like the Michelin man than I do a hunter, and need layers that will keep me from sweating and warm for hours. I wear some of this and some of this with monkey thumbs.

3. Gear.
Knife sharpener and a good knife.
I won this sharpener from Work Shop and OBN. I am going to wrap it up, give it to Dad and then we can use it and I will blog about how awesome it (hopefully is). It came with a cool t-shirt and a bunch of stickers with knife quotes on them. I will have examples in my review.


4. Above all, I buy my Dad and my Father-in-Law their hunting licenses. The first time I did this for my FIL, it blew his mind. He had no idea how I was able to get his MOSES ID number and renew the license (secret: I called IFW, gave them all of his bio information and they helped me get the number. I renewed online and have the confirmation sent to my email so I can reference it every year now. I'm sneaky!)

Comments

  1. Taylor has Browning Full Curl wool pants. I think you'd like them, and they're only $99.

    http://www.bobwards.com/products2.cfm?ID=71214&kid=679993&gclid=CIjq06XDmrQCFQx76wodQ1EAkQ

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  2. I'd put silk long johns on that list. Heaven on a cold hunting day:)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I have a silk under layer for my top and I found that I got colder with it on that I did the year before when I didnt wear it.

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  3. Ammunition, hand warmers, and tax deductible items always make my heart grow a couple sizes.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Tax deductible?!? How do I make that happen??? =)

      Delete
  4. I have my fingers crossed that Meat Eater is under my Christmas tree too!! Apparently I am hard to buy for too so your list may just magically appear on Rambob's computer desktop ;)

    And I think that's an awesome idea buying the hunting license! We do a lot of surf fishing here and you have to have tags for it so I buy my Dad and brother theirs for Christmas. Atleast I don't have to worry about them liking or using their gifts! haha

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It's great to get the licenses, just to take their minds off of doing it. Plus I know they will use it and they are kind of expensive. I will keep my fingers crossed that you get Meat Eater!

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