Monday, March 31, 2014

Here a tree stand, there a tree stand, everywhere a tree stand!

While out on our snowmobile ride, we went down a stretch of powerline that was peppered with deer stands.  I envision something like the Dunkin Donuts/snowplow commercial where one deer steps out and there are at least three hunters ready to take aim. I am glad that we hunt on private land!
Here are the photos.  Which one would YOU want to hunt from?










Wednesday, March 26, 2014

Final ride of the season

Getting ready to ride
A couple weekends ago, Dad, Hubby and I went snowmobiling.  It was warm, sunny and the snow was pretty soft.  While winter has no desire to leave Maine, this was probably the last ride of the year due to our weekends being booked.

Dad's goal for all trips, anywhere and any time of year is to see deer.  I regularly get reports about how many he is seeing and where.  So we headed out with the goal of getting some fresh air and seeing deer.

"If I don't move, they won't see me"
And without fail, Dad found us a deer.  You probably can't see it very well in that cluster of trees, but you can make out the round body and an ear.  It was probably the closest that I have been to a deer while not in a tree stand.  The deer stopped and knew that it was hidden well enough that it could watch us without feeling totally threatened.  We sat and watched it for a few minutes before it decided to bounce up the hill away from us.

Birdhouse? Trail Camera?
We rode some more and I took photos of every tree stand that I saw (blog coming soon).  Next to one of them was this bird house.  A part of me wondered if it were really a trail camera, which would make for a GREAT cover.  I am not sure if you could design it in a way that would let the sensor and camera both work while keeping the birdhouse looking authentic, but what a cool idea!  And once I took the picture of the tree stand next to it, I waved at the birdhouse, because you never - someone may be watching.

The snow was sticky and it was warm enough to drive without gloves which made for some great snowballs!  I got Hubby with a couple of good ones and then would raise my camera when he was close enough to get me with one - can't get the camera wet! ha!

It was a fun way to end the snowmobile season for us and even though parts of Maine are getting another foot of snow tomorrow, hopefully spring is around the corner - and with it TURKEY SEASON!







Sunday, March 23, 2014

A clothing revolution

I have blogged before about women's hunting clothes, or the lack thereof.  This year, as I prepare to take on turkey season, goose season and my beloved deer season, I am starting to really look at what I wear and what I need to stay warm and mobile.  I'm a still hunter.  I find a spot and sit. I have also been given fair warning by Dad that come November, I should assume that I will be pulling 5-6 hour stints in one spot.  Last year, with my layers (three on bottom and seven!! on top), it was tough to get my gun nestled into the crook of my shoulder and have control.  I realized that I needed better, thinner layers.

Photo from Northern Solstice Alpaca's Facebook page.
So I was intrigued when I spoke with Robin from Northern Solstice Alpaca farm at the Sportsman's Show, about the benefits of wearing alpaca clothes.  Besides being especially warm, water proof and cozy, the fibers are hollow so they wick away moisture (unlike wool that holds it in) and helps to regulate body temperature while doing activities while hunting.  The idea that I would not have to worry about my feet getting sweaty and then cold on my walk into the woods and sitting in my stand, had my interest in trying alpaca out.  So I bought two pairs of socks.

I was totally impressed.  I didnt need my slippers on while walking around the house, my feet did not get cold or too hot and they were very soft and comfy.  Plus, unlike wool socks, at least in my case, they did not bunch up or shift around in my shoes when I was outside walking or at work. They stayed in place and didnt slide down.  I was in love!

The only issue - when I wore the black pair, my feet turned black.  It was my understanding that the alpaca fibers were not dyed, but it must have been a certain pair that Robin was talking about and not all of them.   My feet looked like I had been playing in the dirt - but only with the tops of my feet.

Still, I am intrigued with the idea that such a thin layer can keep me so warm.  I am anxious to try them out during turkey season and may look into the long john's for deer season.  I will keep you posted.












Sunday, March 16, 2014

A must read!

If you have ever wondered what life in the Maine outdoors is like, you need to read my friend George Smith's book "A Life Lived Outdoors". It is a compilation of stories and articles that he has written over the years, so you don't need to rush through the book to get to the end of the story.  This a wonderful book that allows you to read a story and set the book down and think about what you have read.  I am currently dreaming about what my future camp should be like and what it will smell and feel like to step outside early on a summer morning with a cup of coffee.

I am only a few stories in, but I have found myself smiling and laughing and yearning to get outside.  I am keeping this book close so that I can sneak in a few stories when I have some time when Owen is napping or while waiting for a meeting to start.

This book is Maine and why we love it so much!

"A Life Lived Outdoors" By George Smith.  Photo from IslandportPress.com









Saturday, March 8, 2014

Sportsman's Shows

There is something awesome about attending Sportsman's shows. You get to be surrounded by people who care about the outdoors as much as you do. I had the opportunity to talk with some great people doing amazing things here in Maine when it comes to the outdoors. A few of those companies, I plan to write future blogs about.

It is a guaranteed to put you in a great mood when you surround yourself with awesome people. I can't wait to share with you some of these folks and their stories.




Thursday, March 6, 2014

Calling BS


After I posted my blog on cyber bullying and outdoors-women, I sent versions out to be published elsewhere.  One place did and it got some great coverage.  The other place did not.  The reasoning, "MY wife has hunted with men for years and has never run into this sort of thing. I have learned not to put much stock in the spewings that come from the cyber world."  Upset with that response, I  headed to Facebook to see what the topics were on some of the hunting groups that I follow.  One had a picture of a woman with the caption, "Honey, I decided to sell those old guns and knifes you have laying around the house" and the man who posted this asked the question, 'What would you do?"  The responses, which were all men, were basically the same - they would kill her.  I sent a message to the guy who ran the page and posted the picture and said how offended I was as an outdoor-woman and how it did nothing but further the stereotype that women can't be credible hunters.  Did I go a little far?  Maybe.  But when a portion of his reply (which was very nice and understanding) had the line "My girlfriend who hunts even laughed" I just shook my head.

It is disappointing to me that people think that just because THEIR wife, mother, girlfriend etc. has never been harassed, that its not a valid concern to have.  I was a little stunned and hurt that my argument was not taken seriously because it had a cyber component to it. 

Then, yesterday, HuntingLife posted an article about this same issue and pointed out that the average female hunter is the new target.  A little validation for me that my blog was relevant and spot on.


The more traditional generation of hunters may not see this as a big deal, but for those of us who are a part of the fast growing world of female hunters - and those hunters who take to social media to talk and share stories about hunting - this is very much a reality and a serious issue.  We can not afford to just blow this off as "cyber gunk" but as a threat against our fellow hunters.  Regardless of age, gender or wither or not someone you know had been bullied, you should be outraged.  Hunters should be appalled that a new generation of hunter has to deal with this sort of thing.  Women are battling to be taken seriously as hunters as well as fight off attacks from cyber trolls. 

I really hope that women who enter the world of hunting will see it as more than having to deal with insulting pictures on social media and a lack of respect from other hunters but from my experiences this past week, that is not going to be the case anytime soon. 




A special Thank you to Craig, Rick and others who emailed me notes of encouragement and support.  It is because of folks like you that women are encouraged and supported to get outdoors and hunt.  My sincerest thanks!