Skip to main content

Millinocket Moose


I woke my son up at 1:40 in the morning so that we could be in Millinocket by 4 AM. I have made it a point this year to take advantage of local Maine guides who are struggling because of the cancellations from out-of-state hunters and anglers. Many guides and outfitters have great discounts on trips and as a local, I am happy to take advantage! We had been in quarantine for 12 weeks at that point and it was leading up to my son’s birthday. So at 4am, we met up with Paul Sannicandro of Moose Woods Guide Service to go on a moose safari. 

The weather called for rain but we were determined to find a few moose before the storms rolled in.  With bug spray, binoculars, cameras and face masks, we headed out on the Golden Road to find some moose.  We didn’t have to go far before Paul spotted a young bull. Excitedly and quietly, we hiked close to the edge of the pond to get a better view.  The sun was just starting to crest the trees and illuminate the snow on the peak of Katahdin. It was one of those moments that makes you take a deep breath and just be grateful - even amid the swarm of mosquitos.

Paul helped my son snap a few pictures with his camera and let him try out his moose call.  When the bull didn’t respond, Paul assured him that it was because the moose couldn’t hear him.  We watched the bull eat and wade through the water.  My son asked a lot of questions and talked about the outdoors, things he learned from Wild Kratts and how he had perfected his moose call. Paul was fantastic and made sure to keep the conversation going with a very talkative (almost) seven-year-old. He commented on and appreciated his love of the outdoors and willingness to get up in the middle of the night to come and look for moose.


We went to two different ponds and each time there was a larger bull moose that was closer to where we were.  My son snapped more photos. We were able to get some great pictures and watch an amazing sunrise. We were the only people on the road.  We saw waterfalls, parts of the Appalachian trail, signs for Baxter State Park and were able to talk about hunting and fishing and the importance of people seeing these natural places.

The rain began to move in mid-morning and we decided to end our adventure a little early. After being up for almost nine hours, a nap was in store.  As we said our goodbyes, Paul handed my son a biography of Theodore Roosevelt, wished him a happy birthday and told him to keep exploring the wild places.

We need more guys like Paul. We need to support and promote the work that they do and continue to nurture the love of the outdoors in the next generation. It was a fantastic trip filled with great stories, bull moose and a breathtaking landscape.  We can not wait to go back.

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Eagles on the trail

Reason number 3,657,935 why my Dad is the best: As we were snowmobiling, we approached a bog and three eagles with about 20 crows took off.  It could only mean one thing in my book - something was dead.  We circled back and walked around in the snow but the birds had left and we couldnt find anything that would resemble a meal.  A part of me thinks that we were in the wrong piece of land and should have been on the other side of the bog but in our snowmobile gear, we were not going to cover a lot of ground.  I was disappointed that we couldn't find what the birds were eating but I was able to get some good pictures of one of the mature eagles and the immature eagle that were flying around.






Where are the women?

This week, my interview with Steve at The Maine Outdoorsman went live. Steve said yesterday 200 people hit his site viewing over 500 pages. That is a lot of people reading about little ole me and hunting. Why? When I think of women who are in the general public's eye and hunt, I can think of 2 - Country singer Miranda Lambert and Sarah Palin. Why only two? Why is the female hunter such a fascinating thing? (I should probably note that I do not have cable so any and all female hunters on the hunting stations are lost to me. I'll keep it to the general public because that's what I am familiar with.) People/media were fascinated by the fact that they could get footage of Palin and her gun, shooting (and gutting) animals but I feel like the nostalgia would be lost if they had the same footage of McCain. Lambert and her hubby Blake Shelton tweet photos of their kills, and comment on what/where they are hunting. I only know this because I follow both. That's it.…

Wanted: Mr. Sportsman

A friend of mine sent me this link and asked what I thought about it.  I had seen it before and was honest when I told him how degrading I felt it was.  Not only was the title of the "Miss Maine Sportsman" application in pink* but the questions were incredibly insulting to those of us that are fighting to be taken seriously among our male counterparts.

Questions like, "Do you clean your own kills/catches?" would never be asked if it were Mr. Maine Sportsman.  It would be assumed that yes, of course men clean what they kill.  Why is that assumption not made of us outdoor women?  Another question, "Do cook [sic] what you catch/kill? If so, what’s your favorite recipe?" would never be asked of men.  

My friend asked me what sort of questions I would ask if it were a Mr. Maine Sportsman pageant.  I came up with a bunch of snarky questions (Do you bait your own hook?) but then I thought about the questions that could have the most impact on the men that would…